FWI

Analysis of pwsFWI prediction

  • HansR 

Introduction

In my previous blog I described why and how the predictions on pwsFWI were implemented. Also I promised a short analysis:

We’re now in version 1.8.3 and it seems all to be working OK. The testing is back on the meteorological level, trying to find out how much a two day ahead prediction will differ from the actual calculation when the day has past.

In this blog I will show the results and try to interpret them.
Please note that this is not a scientific or even a full analysis as I am lacking the resources and the data for that.

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Evaluating FWI for Personal Weather Station

  • HansR 

In An effort for a Simpler Fire Weather Index I described my new FWI and the theory behind it. In short, this pwsFWI (as I have baptised it) is meant to be a generic FWI, valid everywhere and independent of geology and vegetation.

The pwsFWI is a (not too) complex measure of local meteorology, an indicator composed of humidity, wind speed and temperature. It fluctuates under ‘normal’ conditions and if it becomes dryer (a longer period without rain, the number becomes higher. As soon as it starts raining, the value starts dropping.

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The Canadian FWI

  • HansR 

Introduction

I will describe the Canadian FWI as it appears in (scientific) literature. The basic reason for describing this complex fire-weather index is, that it is heavily used in some big countries, notably Canada, France, Australia and New Zealand and that the description of the method of calculation is not readily available.

The FWI also has been introduced in 2007 [1] as the method to assess the fire danger level in a harmonized way throughout Europe.  

Some extensive studies have been made, to measure its performance and its relevance. FWI also contains most parameters relevant to estimating the danger level of the weather in relation to nature fires. In short: the FWI is an important tool for estimating and studying fire weather and fire spreading, with a huge knowledge base spanning almost 100 years.Read More »The Canadian FWI

The Ångström index and the FMI index

  • HansR 

The indices

The Ångström index and the FMI index are highly similar indices in understanding, functioning and behaviour using only two meteorological parameters: temperature and humidity.

These indices are interesting because they are historically important, they are still in use and because, in discussing these indices, they shed some light on the understanding of the what and how of trying to understand estimating fire weather danger.Read More »The Ångström index and the FMI index

The Chandler Burning Index

  • HansR 

Introduction

One of the practical applications of meteorology is the objectivation of nature fire risks on the basis of different meteorological parameters (actual or from the past). Rainfall, humidity, temperature and windspeed are typically parameters to calculate a number indicating the risk on nature fire.

Read More »The Chandler Burning Index